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Our Trap-Neuter-Return Program

In existence for less than a year, Whisker Connection's Trap-Neuter-Return Program has already put a dent in the area's feral cat problem. To date, this program has TNR’d 69 cats and stopped reproduction in 11 feral colonies. Over the next 12 years, that equates to the prevention of over 108,000 feral cats born in our community! Colony caretakers in need of assistance may contact us for more information.

2011 Statistics
as of: Dec 7, 2011

  • Number of Cats Trapped and Neutered: 69
  • Number of Feral Cats Returned: 50
  • Number of Friendly Cats Found in Feral Colonies and Made Available for Adoption: 19
  • Number of Feral Cat Births Prevented: 108,834[1]
  • Number of Cats TNR’d for free: 26
  • Value of Free TNR: $1023
$
Help us continue our TNR program into 2012. Donate today!
Your donation will allow us to do things like purchase traps and other supplies, and subsidize spay/neuter for caregivers who otherwise could not afford it.


TNR FAQ

So what is a feral cat? A feral cat is a regular domestic cat that has not been socialized to humans and will never be adoptable.

What is TNR? TNR stands for Trap-Neuter-Return. With a TNR program, feral cats are trapped, taken to a veterinarian where they are neutered and vaccinated, and then returned to their colony site.

Why catch and kill doesn't work. The traditional approach has been to catch and kill feral cats. Not only is this a cruel and inhumane practice, it simply doesn't work. Once cats are removed from an area, other cats move in to take over the newly available resources. The only real solution is TNR.

Why TNR is the best solution. TNR is the most humane approach to dealing with feral cats. Feral cats are wild animals. They can live long and healthy lives outdoors. TNR stops the breeding cycle and improves the lives of feral cats.

For more information on caring for feral cats and TNR, visit Alley Cat Allies.


Are you a feral cat caretaker? Are you feeding wild or stray cats in your neighborhood?

If you are in need of assistance, we will do our best to help. However, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to assist in every case. Please email your answers to the following questions and we'll get back with you as soon as possible.

  • Your full name.
  • Your address.
  • phone #
  • What is the best way to contact you?
  • Do you own or rent?
  • Approximately how many cats are you currently caring for?
  • Are you able to handle any of the cats?
  • Approximately how many cats would you consider wild?
  • Are you aware of any pregnant females?
  • Are you feeding the cats regularly?
  • How long have you been caring for the cats? or how long have you been aware of the colony?
  • Are you able to contribute to the cost of neutering the cats?
  • Will you continue to care for the cats once they are returned?




References

1. Johnson, Karen, "A report on Trap/ Alter/ Release Programs," National Pet Alliance (1995)